Richard Ford Burley

Richard is a PhD candidate in English at Boston College where he studies Remix Culture and medieval literature. He also writes a six-days-a-week digital culture blog called This Week In Tomorrow as a way of staying upbeat about the world. He lives in Brighton with the two people who understand him best: his wife and their cat.

Richard is a PhD candidate in English at Boston College where he studies Remix Culture and medieval literature. He also writes a six-days-a-week digital culture blog called This Week In Tomorrow as a way of staying upbeat about the world. He lives in Brighton with the two people who understand him best: his wife and their cat.

Hello, World

Alice sits on the edge of the sofa, almost impervious to the whispers of the men and women dressed in mourning clothes milling about in the living room. The drapes are drawn for the somber occasion. Alice’s hands are folded in her lap, her brown hair long and parted. Her clothes are simple: a plain but tailored dress and a pair of glossy black shoes.

“Can you even imagine?”

One woman’s words slip between the guests to find their way to her, but she doesn’t flinch. She knows not to react when she’s unsure of how, that much has always been a given. A conservative choice, to be sure, but that, too, is by design.

Julie has died. Alice knows that, too: her foster mother, three days ago, in a car accident, the fatal combination of a failed airbag deployment and a slow-reacting holdout in the other car. A human driver. Other whispers in the room say there will be a lawsuit, that it’s unbelievable that anyone is still allowed to drive their own cars these days, that there ought to be a law.

“And poor Emmet,” they say. Her foster father. “Can you even imagine?”

“Do you think they’ll take it away?”