Slush statistics, August 2012

September 3, 2012
Dawn

Our total subs dropped this month. I’m hoping it was just because it was summer and people were busy with summer stuff. Please continue sending us your stories, though.

*Total submissions: 64

*Duotrope responses received this month: 34
(currently 430 responses total)

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 27

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 20

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 0

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 0

5) The other editors and I did consider holding, but in the end rejected. They still deserve honorable mentions, however: 4

6) Were held for voting: 2

Rejected from the hold pile: 2

(total currently in the hold pile, to be voted by the end of November): 2

7 ) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 6

8) Resubmission of previously rejected story: 1
(Unless we specifically ask for a rewrite–and it will be clear if we do–please don’t resend us stories we’ve rejected previously.)

9) Didn’t match our guidelines: 2
(These are stories outside our word count or poetry or some other form we simply don’t accept)

[Stories were sent back to the author with requests to resubmit due to improper submissions, typically because of not being subbed through the form, being sent as attachments rather than inline body text, or sent to the wrong address. These weren’t counted in the total monthly submissions: 7

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science Fiction (stories set in the future with/without advanced tech, but not including spaceships, aliens, etc.): 11

Science Fiction (traditional space opera involving space travel, aliens, other planets, etc.): 17

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include sword & sorcery, fairies, etc.):

Urban fantasy: 13
[Vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell. If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Magical realism, slipstream, etc.: 5

Other: 5

Not spec: 6

—–

First Person POV: 19

Second Person POV:
[These are going to be an exceptionally hard sell.]

Epistolary/Monologues (not straight 1st person):

Present tense: 5
[Present tense isn't our preferred form, although we have published it]

Novella: 3
[We only publish one to two novellas per issue, so our acceptance is low with them. However, the low number of novella submissions means chances of them being picked is higher]

Flash: 16
[We publish flash, but generally not too much of it. A fully developed plot is important, and the main reason most flash doesn't make the "hold" category is that it doesn't have a fully developed plot. We're happy to read flash, but do make sure it has a plot.]

 

Slush Statistics, July 2012

August 1, 2012
Dawn

I’d like to welcome Sarah Hirsch, author of The Nightmare Eater (winter, 2012) to the team as a first reader along with Henry Fields.  She’s jumped in quickly and is doing a good job.  For anyone wondering, this brings our current fiction team to 3 people, with Daniel (executive editor) occasionally helping out as well if we’re having problems keeping up with the submissions.

Decisions to hold and publish stories are made by all four of us, after which they’re passed over to Eleni, our art director, who works on getting stories illustrated.

*Total submissions: 100

*Duotrope responses received this month: 42
(currently 424 responses total)

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 32

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 37

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 1

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 4

5) The other editors and I did consider holding, but in the end rejected. They still deserve honorable mentions, however: 4

6) Were held for voting: 5

Rejected from the hold pile: 7

(total currently in the hold pile, to be voted by August): 11

7 ) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 15
(A bunch of these were sent in a bulk as a multiple submission, which we also don’t accept)

[Stories were sent back to the author with requests to resubmit due to improper submissions, typically because of not being subbed through the form, being sent as attachments rather than inline body text, or sent to the wrong address. These weren’t counted in the total monthly submissions: 7

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science Fiction (stories set in the future with/without advanced tech, but not including spaceships, aliens, etc.): 26

Science Fiction (traditional space opera involving space travel, aliens, other planets, etc.): 18

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include sword & sorcery, fairies, etc.): 15

Urban fantasy: 6
[Vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell. If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Magical realism, slipstream, etc. 12

Other: 7

Not spec: 15
[How people can see our zine and not notice it's spec fic, I'm not sure. Unsurprisingly, the likelihood of us publishing something that isn't spec fic is nil, no matter how good it is.]

—–

First Person POV: 27

Second Person POV:
[These are going to be an exceptionally hard sell.]

Epistolary/Monologues (not straight 1st person): 1

Present tense: 5
[Present tense isn't our preferred form, although we have published it]

Novella: 12
[We only publish one to two novellas per issue, so our acceptance is low with them. However, the low number of novella submissions means chances of them being picked is higher]

Flash: 23
[We publish flash, but generally not too much of it. A fully developed plot is important, and the main reason most flash doesn't make the "hold" category is that it doesn't have a fully developed plot. We're happy to read flash, but do make sure it has a plot.]

 

Slush statistics, June 2012

July 1, 2012
Dawn

Our online submission form crashed for a few days this month, and unfortunately we lost all the submissions from those days and had no way of knowing who the authors were to contact them and ask them to resubmit. That means our submissions are low this month, although if it hadn’t been for that, our numbers would be about like other months.

If you submitted something (or ever do submit something) and don’t get a response for more than 3-4 days, send a query to me at editors@thecoloredlens.com .

*Total submissions: 83

*Duotrope responses received this month: 35
(currently 414 responses total)

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 19

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 20

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 10

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 7

5) The other editors and I did consider holding, but in the end rejected. They still deserve honorable mentions, however: 9

6) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 3

7 ) Were held for voting: 6

(total of 14 currently in the hold pile, to be voted by August)

[Stories were sent back to the author with requests to resubmit due to improper submissions, typically because of not being subbed through the form, being sent as attachments rather than inline body text, or sent to the wrong address. These weren’t counted in the total monthly submissions.

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science Fiction (stories set in the future with/without advanced tech, but not including spaceships, aliens, etc.): 19

Science Fiction (traditional space opera involving space travel, aliens, other planets, etc.): 5

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include sword & sorcery, fairies, etc.): 12

Magical realism, slipstream, etc. 10

Urban fantasy: 14
[Vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell. If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Other: 20

Not spec: 3
[How people can see our zine and not notice it's spec fic, I'm not sure. Unsurprisingly, the likelihood of us publishing something that isn't spec fic is nil, no matter how good it is.]

Not submitted through the submission form so asked to be resubmitted:

—–

First Person POV: 26

Second Person POV:
[These are going to be an exceptionally hard sell.]

Epistolary/Monologues (not straight 1st person): 3

Present tense: 4
[Present tense isn't our preferred form, although we have published it]

Novella: 4
[We only publish one to two novellas per issue, so our acceptance is low with them. However, the low number of novella submissions means chances of them being picked is higher]

Flash: 14
[We publish flash, but generally not too much of it. A fully developed plot is important, and the main reason most flash doesn't make the "hold" category is that it doesn't have a fully developed plot. We're happy to read flash, but do make sure it has a plot.]

 

Slush Statistics, May 2012

June 1, 2012
Dawn

May was our 1 year anniversary of accepting submissions. Our submissions seem to be holding steady at around the 110-120 mark, which I’m glad for. Oddly, I’ve noticed a tendency for submissions to pick up around the beginning and end of each month, and to be a bit slower mid-month. I have absolutely no theories as to why this is. As an author, I always resubbed something somewhere else as soon as I got a rejection from one market, but maybe not everyone does this. (This would be an interesting comment topic if anyone wants to comment.)

*Total submissions: 112

*Duotrope responses received this month: 50
(currently 442 responses total)

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 30

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 49

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 9

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 3

5) The other editors and I did consider holding, but in the end rejected. They still deserve honorable mentions, however: 5

6) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 5

7 ) Were held for voting: 8

- Held stories that were rejected: 0

(total of 8 currently in the hold pile, to be voted by August)

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science Fiction (stories set in the future with/without advanced tech, but not including spaceships, aliens, etc.): 25

Science Fiction (traditional space opera involving space travel, aliens, other planets, etc.): 16

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include sword & sorcery, fairies, etc.): 21

Magical realism, slipstream, etc. 14

Urban fantasy: 24
[Vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell. If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Other: 7

Not spec: 5
[How people can see our zine and not notice it's spec fic, I'm not sure. Unsurprisingly, the likelihood of us publishing something that isn't spec fic is nil, no matter how good it is.]

Not submitted through the submission form so asked to be resubmitted: 3

—–

First Person POV: 15

Second Person POV: 1
[These are going to be an exceptionally hard sell.]

Epistolary/Monologues (not straight 1st person): 3

Present tense: 3
[Present tense isn't our preferred form, although we have published it]

Novella: 2
[We only publish one to two novellas per issue, so our acceptance is low with them. However, the low number of novella submissions means chances of them being picked is higher]

Flash: 16
[We publish flash, but generally not too much of it. A fully developed plot is important, and the main reason most flash doesn't make the "hold" category is that it doesn't have a fully developed plot. We're happy to read flash, but do make sure it has a plot.]

 

Slush statistics, April, 2012

May 2, 2012
Dawn

Subs were down a bit this month. The first couple weeks had very few submissions. This was odd because usually we get more at the beginning of the month. They picked up drastically the last couple weeks. I’m idly blaming taxes in the US, for lack of any other explanation.

*Total submissions: 107

*Duotrope responses received this month: 42
(currently 389 responses total)

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 30

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 37

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 12

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 2

5) The other editors and I did consider holding, but in the end rejected. They still deserve honorable mentions, however: 7

6) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 9

7) The story was over the word limit: 2

8 ) Were held for voting: 6

- Held stories that were rejected: 6

(total of 10 currently in the hold pile, to be voted by May)

- Accepted for web-exclusive publication: 2

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science Fiction (stories set in the future with/without advanced tech, but not including spaceships, aliens, etc.): 31

Science Fiction (traditional space opera involving space travel, aliens, other planets, etc.): 13

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include sword & sorcery, fairies, etc.): 16

Magical realism, slipstream, etc. 16

Urban fantasy: 20 [Vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell. If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Other: 9

Not spec: 2 [How people can see our zine and not notice it's spec fic, I'm not sure. Unsurprisingly, the likelihood of us publishing something that isn't spec fic is nil, no matter how good it is.]

—–

First Person POV: 20

Second Person POV: 1 [These are going to be an exceptionally hard sell.]

Epistolary/Monologues (not straight 1st person): 2

Present tense: 1 [Present tense isn't our preferred form, although we have published it]

Novella: 12 [We only publish one to two novellas per issue, so our acceptance is low with them. However, the low number of novella submissions means chances of them being picked is higher]

Flash: 24 [We publish flash, but generally not too much of it. A fully developed plot is important, and the main reason most flash doesn't make the "hold" category is that it doesn't have a fully developed plot. We're happy to read flash, but do make sure it has a plot.]

 

Slush statistics, March 2012

April 1, 2012
Dawn

Submissions continue to rise. Yeay!

Up to now, I’ve been doing all the first reading, with occasional help from our executive editor Daniel. It’s reached the point that I can’t keep up with it anymore, though, and so we’ve brought Henry Fields on board to help with the slush pile. He’s been doing a great job and I’m happy to welcome him to The Colored Lens.

——
*Total submissions: 117

*Duotrope responses received this month: 52
(currently 347 responses total)

*Held for final voting: 9
(total of 11, to be voted by May)

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 25

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 45

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 21

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 7

5) The other editors and I did consider holding, but in the end rejected. They still deserve honorable mentions, however: 2

6) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 9

7) Were held for voting: 9

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science Fiction (stories set in the future with/without advanced tech, but not including spaceships, aliens, etc.): 19

Science Fiction (traditional space opera involving space travel, aliens, other planets, etc.): 10 [Although we don't specifically prefer these, we get few enough of them that we'd like to have more.]

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include sword & sorcery, fairies, etc.): 25 [We're getting more of these now and our numbers seem to be about what we'd hoped.]

Urban fantasy: 14 [We're not interested in vampires, werewolves, etc. Other things are possibilities.]

Magical realism, slipstream, etc. 32

Urban fantasy: 14 [Vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell. If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Other: 8

Not spec: 9 [How people can see our zine and not notice it's spec fic, I'm not sure. Unsurprisingly, the likelihood of us publishing something that isn't spec fic is nil, no matter how good it is.]

—–

First Person POV: 30

Second Person POV: 2 [These are going to be an exceptionally hard sell.]

Epistolary/Monologues (not straight 1st person): 1

Present tense: 10 [Note that present tense isn't our preferred form, although we have published it, and undoubtedly will again]

Novella: 6 [We only publish one novella every two issues, so our acceptance is low with them. However, the low number of novella submissions means chances of them being picked is higher]

Flash: 24 [We publish flash, but generally not too much of it. A fully developed plot is important, though, and the main reason most flash doesn't make the "hold" category is that it doesn't really have a plot. We're happy to read flash, but do make sure it has a plot.]

 

Slush Statistics, Febraury 2012

March 1, 2012
Dawn

Our submissions are rising again, happily. And Feb was a short month on top of it. Keep them coming!

——
*Total submissions: 105

*Duotrope responses received this month: 51
(currently 295 responses total)

*Held for final voting: 5
(total of 13, to be voted on soon)
(6 previously held stories were rejected)

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 17

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 40

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 32

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 5

5) The other editors and I did consider holding, but in the end rejected. They still deserve honorable mentions, however: 2

6) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 3

7) Were held for voting: 5

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science Fiction (stories set in the future with/without advanced tech, but not including spaceships, aliens, etc.): 27

Science Fiction (traditional space opera involving space travel, aliens, other planets, etc.): 12 [Although we don't specifically prefer these, we get few enough of them that we'd like to have more.]

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include sword & sorcery, fairies, etc.): 15 [Although we don't specifically prefer these, we get few enough of them that we'd like to have more.]

Magical realism, slipstream, etc. 37

Urban fantasy: 4 [Vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell. If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Other: 7

Not spec: 3 [How people can see our zine and not notice it's spec fic, I'm not sure. Unsurprisingly, the likelihood of us publishing something that isn't spec fic is nil, no matter how good it is.]

—–

First Person POV: 31

Second Person POV: 1 [These are going to be an exceptionally hard sell.]

Epistolary/Monologues (not straight 1st person): 3

Present tense: 7 [Note that present tense isn't our preferred form, although we have published it, and undoubtedly will again]

Novella: 1 [We only publish one novella every two issues, so our acceptance is low with them. However, the low number of novella submissions means chances of them being picked is higher]

Flash: 15 [We publish flash, but generally not too much of it. A fully developed plot is important, though, and the main reason most flash doesn't make the "hold" category is that it doesn't really have a plot. We're happy to read flash, but do make sure it has a plot.]

 

Slush Statistics, January 2012

February 1, 2012
Dawn

Our number of submissions is up, which is great.  I can’t help wondering if the new year had something to do with it.

I realized, as I was posting, that my stat tracking doesn’t quite reflect the categories here.  I’ve tended to put “anything with magic” in the “fantasy” category.  Next month I’m going to break it down into more clearly defined categories.

I’ve also added notes below about the likelihood of some things being published with us.

*Total submissions: 92

*Duotrope responses received this month: 46
(currently 244 responses total)

*Held for final voting: 7
(total of 12, to be voted on in Feb)

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 18

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 40

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 14

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 6

5) The other editors and I did consider holding, but in the end rejected. They still deserve honorable mentions, however: 2

6) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 4

7) Were held for voting: 7

*) Resubmission of previously rejected story (not a rewrite request): 1

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science fiction: 33

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include traditional fairy/folk tales and anything with gods, devils, etc.): 36  [We get very little traditional sword and sorcery type fantasy.  It's not that we like it more than other things, but we get so little of it that we tend to look favorably on what we do get.]

Urban fantasy: 11 [Vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell.  If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Other: 8

Not spec: 4  [How people can see our zine and not notice it's spec fic, I'm not sure.  Unsurprisingly, the likelihood of us publishing something that isn't spec fic is nil, no matter how good it is.]

—–

Stories written in First Person POV: 20

Stories written as Epistolary/Monologues (not straight 1st person): 3

Stories written in Second Person POV: 2 [Note that 2nd person is an exceptionally hard sell with us]

Stories written in present tense: 19 [Note that present tense isn't our preferred form, although we have published it, and undoubtedly will again]

Novella: 1 [We only publish one novella every two issues, so our acceptance is low with them.  However, the low number of novella submissions means chances of them being picked is higher]

Flash: 19 [We publish flash, but generally not more than one an issue.  A fully developed plot is important, though, and the main reason most flash doesn't make the "hold" category is that it doesn't really have a plot.  We're happy to read flash, but do make sure it has a plot.]

 

Slush Statistics, Dec, 2011

January 2, 2012
Dawn

This was the first month we were not listed as a fledgeling market on duotrope. I assume that’s related to the upturn in submissions. I assume the holidays may have had some influence on subs, but I don’t know if it would have meant we got more or less.

*Total submissions: 76

*Duotrope responses received for November: 39
(currently 198 responses total)

*Held for final voting: 4
(total of 5, to be voted on in Feb)

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the real reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 15

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 32

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 16

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 6

5) The other editors and I did consider holding, but in the end rejected. They still deserve honorable mentions, however: 2

6) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 1

7) Were held for voting: 4

*) Were rejected from the hold pile: 1 (for the winter issue)

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science fiction: 26

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include traditional fairy/folk tales and anything with gods, devils, etc.): 28

Urban fantasy: 7

Other (magical realism, alternate history, slipstream, superheroes, anthropomorphism, bizarro, and stories that didn’t seem to have any speculative element.): 16

Not spec: 1

—–

Stories written in First Person POV: 15

Stories written in Second Person POV: 1

Stories written in present tense: 8

Novella: 3

Flash: 12

 

Slush statistics, Nov 2011

December 1, 2011
Dawn

*Total submissions: 54

*Duotrope responses received for November: 20
(currently 159 responses total)

*Held for final voting: 8 (wow, that’s a lot)
(total of 10, to be voted on in Nov)

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the real reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 21

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 10

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 11

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 3

5) The other editors and I did consider holding, but in the end rejected. They still deserve honorable mentions, however: 1

6) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 0

7) Were held for voting: 8

*) Were rejected from the hold pile: 5 (Still voting on the remaining stories in the hold pile)

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science fiction: 13

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include traditional fairy/folk tales and anything with gods, devils, etc.): 14

Urban fantasy: 12

Other (magical realism, alternate history, slipstream, superheroes, anthropomorphism, bizarro, and stories that didn’t seem to have any speculative element.): 15

Stories written in First Person POV: 10

Stories written in Second Person POV: 0

Stories written in Third Person POV: 44

Stories written in present tense: 4

Novella: 3

 

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