March, 2015 statistics

April 1, 2015
Dawn

I haven’t posted these for a while, but I do plan to post them a couple times a year.

Overall, we’ve been holding fairly steady for the last year or so, though, so you can assume other months not posted here are roughly the same as this one.

As a random side comment, as an author I’ve always wondered about whether editors actually meant it when they said they’d be happy to see more, or if they were just being polite in a form message. So for anyone wondering about TCL, when we say that, we do indeed mean it.

Total submissions in March: 37
Held: 6
Rejected: 31

Rejected for plot issues: 16
Rejected for stylistic issues: 4
Theme: 0
No real reason, just not quite right: 3
Discussed with editorial team, then rejected: 5
Not spec: 3

 

Submission status – June, 2014

July 1, 2014
Dawn

I haven’t posted these for a while, but I do plan to post them periodically.

Total submissions: 40
Held: 10 (this is unusually high for us, although it’s partially that we tend to hold more stories at the beginning of the period until we know we have enough. We often go through and reject stories from the hold pile as we get more than that.)

Rejected: 30

Rejected for plot issues: 20
Rejected for stylistic issues: 8
Theme: 1
Didn’t match our guidelines: 1

——-
I’m not posting genre at the moment, largely just because it takes time to go back and count it, and I didn’t get the impression that people were too interested. If you’d like me to do this in the future, though, let me know and I’ll include genre in the future as well.

 

Insights into the Editorial Process

April 5, 2013
Editor In Chief

For many writers, what happens after they submit a story is a bit of a mystery. Our Executive Editor has addressed this . It’s an enlightening read, so go check it out over at the Enchanted Spark blog.

 

Should I continue to post submission stats?

April 3, 2013
Dawn

I’m considering no longer posting these statistics. Our average monthly stats have leveled out and become fairly consistent. We’ve been hovering around 60 submissions a month for a long time now. (We received 56 submissions last month.) I’m not saying I wouldn’t ever post stats again. I may still do it periodically, especially if they change. I’m just not sure if it’s worth doing every month.

If you find the monthly stats interesting and would like me to continue, leave a comment. If enough people comment, I’ll happily continue. Otherwise, I may only do it every few months.

 

Slush Statistics, February 2013

March 3, 2013
Dawn

Subs were down this month, although we got some very good ones. I’m hoping the decrease in submissions is just a fluke and not a result of duotrope going paid or something that would otherwise indicate a long-term drop in submissions. Of course, February being a short month is also relevant to some degree.

*Total submissions: 49

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 13

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 19

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 6

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 0

5) The editorial team considered holding, but in the end rejected: 5

6) Were held for voting: 5
(2 were ultimately rejected from the hold pile, the rest were accepted. 1 was accepted for the next issue, but was too late for us to get into this one)

7) Rewrite request: 2 (and then held)

8 ) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 1

10) Resubmission of previously rejected story: 0
(Unless we specifically ask for a rewrite–and it will be clear if we do–please don’t resend us stories we’ve rejected previously.)

9) Didn’t match our guidelines: 0
(These are stories outside our word count or poetry or some other form we simply don’t accept)

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science Fiction with space ships/aliens: 3

Science Fiction with stories generically set in the future on Earth: 8

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include sword & sorcery, fairies, etc.): 12

Urban fantasy: 11
[Anything set in the real world with supernatural elements. Note that vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell. If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Magical realism, slipstream, etc.:11

Other: 2

Alternative History: 1

Not Spec: 1

—————

Flash (less than 1000 words): 6

Short stories (1000-7499 words): 36

Novelette (7500-17,490 words): 7

Novella (17,050-20,000 words–note we don’t accept more than 20,000 words): 0

 

Slush Statistics, January 2013

February 6, 2013
Dawn

I’m posting this a bit late because we had a few stories we were considering holding, so I wanted to wait and see where we put them before posting. These stats are just for January, however.

*Total submissions: 71

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 18

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 25

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 2

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 3

5) The editorial team considered holding, but in the end rejected: 5

6) Were held for voting: 4
(total currently in the hold pile, to be voted by the end of February): 5

7) Rewrite request: 1

8 ) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 6

10) Resubmission of previously rejected story: 0
(Unless we specifically ask for a rewrite–and it will be clear if we do–please don’t resend us stories we’ve rejected previously.)

9) Didn’t match our guidelines: 0
(These are stories outside our word count or poetry or some other form we simply don’t accept)

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science Fiction with space ships/aliens: 8

Science Fiction with stories generically set in the future on Earth: 18

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include sword & sorcery, fairies, etc.): 14

Urban fantasy: 5
[Vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell. If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Magical realism, slipstream, etc.:8

Other: 7

Not Spec: 6

—————

Flash (less than 1000 words): 5

Short stories (1000-7499 words): 55

Novelette (7500-17,490 words): 6

Novella (17,050-20,000 words–note we don’t accept more than 20,000 words): 0

 

Slush Statistics, December 2012

January 1, 2013
Dawn

Submissions were really slow at the beginning of the month, and right before Christmas, but average the rest of the time.

*Total submissions: 59

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 22

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 20

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 3

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 8

5) The editorial team considered holding, but in the end rejected: 5

6) Were held for voting: 1
(total currently in the hold pile, to be voted by the end of February): 5

7) Rewrite request: 0

8 ) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 1

10) Resubmission of previously rejected story: 0
(Unless we specifically ask for a rewrite–and it will be clear if we do–please don’t resend us stories we’ve rejected previously.)

9) Didn’t match our guidelines: 0
(These are stories outside our word count or poetry or some other form we simply don’t accept)

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science Fiction with space ships/aliens: 6

Science Fiction with stories generically set in the future on Earth: 19

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include sword & sorcery, fairies, etc.): 15

Urban fantasy: 6
[Vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell. If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Magical realism, slipstream, etc.:5

Other: 6

Not Spec: 1

—————

Flash (less than 1000 words): 10

Short stories (1000-7499 words): 43

Novelette (7500-17,490 words): 6

Novella (17,050-20,000 words–note we don’t accept more than 20,000 words):

 

Slush Statistics, November 2012

December 1, 2012
Dawn

I wasn’t sure how Nanowrimo would affect stats, but it appears it hasn’t affected us much at all. There was a lull at Thanksgiving, but that’s not a surprise. Things picked up again after.

*Total submissions: 68

*Duotrope responses received this month: 42
(currently 500 responses total) – It’s always been an idle goal of mine to hit 500 duotrope responses, and we’ve done it. Yeay!

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 17

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 37

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 2

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 0

5) The editorial team considered holding, but in the end rejected. They still deserve honorable mentions: 4

6) Were held for voting: 4
(total currently in the hold pile, to be voted by the end of November): 4

7) Held and then accepted or rejected for winter issue: 3

8) Rewrite request: 1

9 ) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 0

10) Resubmission of previously rejected story: 1
(Unless we specifically ask for a rewrite–and it will be clear if we do–please don’t resend us stories we’ve rejected previously.)

9) Didn’t match our guidelines: 0
(These are stories outside our word count or poetry or some other form we simply don’t accept)

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science Fiction with space ships/aliens: 3

Science Fiction with stories generically set in the future on Earth: 13

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include sword & sorcery, fairies, etc.): 23

Urban fantasy: 13
[Vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell. If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Magical realism, slipstream, etc.: 15

Not spec: 1

—————

Flash (less than 1000 words): 15

Short stories (1000-7499 words): 50

Novelette (7500-17,490 words): 3

Novella (17,050-20,000 words–note we don’t accept more than 20,000 words): 1

 

Slush Statistics, October 2012

November 1, 2012
Dawn

We kicked off our new online submission form this month. Actually, we introduced it at the end of last month, but for stat-tallying, we continued using the old system as well. This month we’ve switched over to only using the database. I like it, but we’re still working out bugs. If you have any questions or suggestions, please let us know.

One downside of the submission form is that we don’t currently have it set up so there’s a convenient way to count the point of view & tense stats. Before poor Daniel goes to the bother of coding it so that we can tally those, I thought I’d see if people were even interested. So, if you read this and would like to leave a comment on whether you do/don’t find those stats interesting, the feedback will be welcomed. Of course, any other feedback is also welcome, but this is currently of particular interest.

*Total submissions: 62

*Duotrope responses received this month: 30
(currently 480 responses total)

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 17

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 27

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 1

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 4

5) The editorial team considered holding, but in the end rejected. They still deserve honorable mentions: 3

6) Were held for voting: 5

(total currently in the hold pile, to be voted by the end of November): 11

7 ) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 3

8) Resubmission of previously rejected story: 1
(Unless we specifically ask for a rewrite–and it will be clear if we do–please don’t resend us stories we’ve rejected previously.)

9) Didn’t match our guidelines: 0
(These are stories outside our word count or poetry or some other form we simply don’t accept)

[Stories were sent back to the author with requests to resubmit due to improper submissions, typically because of not being subbed through the form, being sent as attachments rather than inline body text, or sent to the wrong address. These weren’t counted in the total monthly submissions: 10

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science Fiction: 25

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include sword & sorcery, fairies, etc.): 15

Urban fantasy: 7
[Vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell. If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Magical realism, slipstream, etc.: 12

Not spec: 3

 

—————

Flash (less than 1000 words): 13

Short stories (1000-7499 words):  45

Novelette (7500-17,490 words): 2

Novella (17,050-20,000 words–note we don’t accept more than 20,000 words): 2

 

 

Slush Statistics, September 2012

October 1, 2012
Dawn

Our subs were up this month, but we had a low stretch after bringing the web submission form online. I hope it isn’t a problem with the sub form. Incidentally, if anyone reading this would leave a comment letting us know if you do/don’t like the submission form, or offering any feedback, it would be welcome.

*Total submissions: 71

*Duotrope responses received this month: 21
(currently 460 responses total)

Breakdown of reasons for rejections (note: All rejections are personal and the reason given for a rejection is the specific reason unique to that submission, even if it does look a bit like a generic form rejection.)

1) The writing wasn’t what we were looking for stylistically: 22

2) The story’s plot wasn’t what we were looking for. (Possibly the story seemed to be primarily a study of a character, idea, world, etc. Possibly the plot was slower to develop than we wanted. Possibly the pacing felt off, etc.): 37

3) The writing and plot were good, but the theme or content wasn’t what we were looking for, or we’d received other stories we liked better with the same theme, etc.: 0

4) Everything about the story was good, and there was nothing I could identify that knocked it out of the “hold” category, but it just didn’t QUITE make the cut: 2

5) The other editors and I did consider holding, but in the end rejected. They still deserve honorable mentions, however: 2

6) Were held for voting: 6

(total currently in the hold pile, to be voted by the end of November): 8

7 ) The story wasn’t speculative fiction: 3

8) Resubmission of previously rejected story: 0
(Unless we specifically ask for a rewrite–and it will be clear if we do–please don’t resend us stories we’ve rejected previously.)

9) Didn’t match our guidelines: 1
(These are stories outside our word count or poetry or some other form we simply don’t accept)

[Stories were sent back to the author with requests to resubmit due to improper submissions, typically because of not being subbed through the form, being sent as attachments rather than inline body text, or sent to the wrong address. These weren’t counted in the total monthly submissions: 10

————–

And here’s the general information of what kind of submissions we received.

Science Fiction (stories set in the future with/without advanced tech, but not including spaceships, aliens, etc.): 15

Science Fiction (traditional space opera involving space travel, aliens, other planets, etc.): 14

Fantasy (traditional fantasy, to include sword & sorcery, fairies, etc.): 15

Urban fantasy: 13
[Vampires, werewolves, etc. are going to be a hard sell. If you do have one, make sure it's unique.]

Magical realism, slipstream, etc.: 8

Other: 3

Not spec: 3

—–

First Person POV: 17

Second Person POV: 1
[These are going to be an exceptionally hard sell.]

Epistolary/Monologues (not straight 1st person):

Present tense: 4
[Present tense isn't our preferred form, although we have published it]

Novella: 2
[We only publish one to two novellas per issue, so our acceptance is low with them. However, the low number of novella submissions means chances of them being picked is higher]

Flash: 9
[We publish flash, but generally not too much of it. A fully developed plot is important, and the main reason most flash doesn't make the "hold" category is that it doesn't have a fully developed plot. We're happy to read flash, but do make sure it has a plot.]

 

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